What Is Water Extraction?

Water extraction is just one of the vital stages of a successful water damage recovery project. Once the first, most urgent concern—stopping the source of water—is accomplished, the next priority becomes water removal. This means removing deep standing water that may be present anywhere in the house (especially the basement), utilizing submersible pumps or other suction devices to pull out large amounts of water in a short period of time. After the major volume of floodwater is out of the house, water extraction comes next.

Getting All the Water Out

The water extraction process refers to the removal of residual water wherever it may have migrated inside the structure. This leftover water that has soaked into walls, floors, and ceilings, as well as materials like carpet and padding, can be a source of continuing damage to affected building materials, as well as a trigger for toxic mold growth. Removing all residual water is critical. It’s a process that requires professional equipment and procedures designed specifically for the purpose: 

  • Powerful truck-mounted vacuum water extraction equipment pulls residual water out of surfaces and absorbent materials. Portable extraction units are also utilized to reach smaller areas of the house.
  • Professional water extraction also includes technology such as hygrometers, moisture meters, and other accessories to locate and measure the amount of saturation.
  • Infrared imaging can be utilized to locate hidden water remaining inside areas such as wall voids or within the ceiling structure.   
  • Fast removal of residual water speeds the drying time of the interior which, in turn, inhibits mold contamination often associated with water damage.

After the Water is Gone

Following comprehensive water extraction, the drying phase begins to eliminate trace moisture and high indoor humidity. This phase typically utilizes industrial-grade dehumidifiers and high-volume air movers to speed evaporation of remaining moisture. If mold growth is possible, affected areas will receive disinfectant treatment as well as air sampling to detect the presence of airborne spores in the house.

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